You are here: Home / News Release Archives / 2014 / May / Research Suggests U.S. Defense Industry Adjust Strategy for Coming Decade

Research Suggests U.S. Defense Industry Adjust Strategy for Coming Decade

Looming changes to the U.S. defense landscape may call for adjustments in product development, operations, and global strategy, according to Terrence Guay, clinical professor of international business at the Penn State Smeal College of Business.
May 20, 2014

Looming changes to the U.S. defense landscape may call for adjustments in product development, operations, and global strategy, according to Terrence Guay, clinical professor of international business at the Penn State Smeal College of Business.

In a recent analysis for The CIP (Center for Infrastructure Protection) Report, Guay outlines three primary factors precipitating that shift: imminent U.S. defense budget cuts, a U.S. military transition from traditional weaponry to technological dominance, and continued changes in the global arms market.

U.S. Defense Budget Cuts
Considering the withdrawals from Iraq and Afghanistan and the growing buzz at home around balancing the budget, the U.S. defense budget stands to face significant cuts.

“Since U.S. defense spending comprises about 40 percent of the global total, cuts in the U.S. will have a disproportionate effect on international arms sales.”

To mitigate possible losses in U.S. government business due to budget cuts, Guay recommends that the defense sector industry diversify into non-defense business.

“Indeed, that is the strategy pursued by some of the largest companies,” he writes. “In 2005, Boeing derived 56 percent of its revenue from defense. By 2012, it had dropped to 38 percent.”

Transition Toward Technology Over Weaponry
A trend beginning with the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the U.S. toward the “high-technology dimensions of security—particularly areas like intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance” will continue into the coming decade.

As a result, declining Pentagon budgets will most likely be focused in areas of high technology versus traditional weaponry.

“Thus, the proposed 2015 defense budget aims to eliminate programs like the A-10 aircraft, but spend more on the Global Hawk reconnaissance drone and cyber security,” Guay writes.

Global Arms Market
The likely decrease in U.S. military business will make defense industry exports even more important, but the global arms environment is undergoing some changes of its own. European countries have already vastly reduced arms expenditures in an attempt to mitigate the region’s recent economic woes.

“Since U.S. defense spending comprises about 40 percent of the global total, cuts in the U.S. will have a disproportionate effect on international arms sales,” he writes. “This means competition for arms sales in markets outside the NATO region will intensify.”

However, he continues, “technological sophistication and foreign policy considerations will continue to favor the U.S. industry.”

Guay’s analysis, “The Defense Industrial Base in an Age of Uncertainty,” appeared in the April 2014 issue of The CIP Report, a publication of the Center for Infrastructure Protection & Homeland Security at George Mason University. Guay, a Smeal faculty member since 2004, has expertise in the defense industry, globalization and trade, Europe, business-government relations, and non-governmental organizations.

Recent News
Businessweek ranks Smeal MBA Program No. 2 in ROI 17 Nov

The Penn State Smeal MBA Program ranks No. 2 in return on investment according to the latest Bloomberg Businessweek rankings.

Smeal Names Four New Members to Its Board of Visitors 31 Oct

The Penn State Smeal College of Business has named four new members to its Board of Visitors. Joining the board are Jon Grosso, ’89, executive vice president and director of stores for Kohl’s Department Stores; Ron Morgan, ’93, co-founder of MorganFranklin Consulting; Stephen Reeves, ’81, executive vice president and chief financial officer of Enviva Holdings; and Salomon “Sal” Sredni, ’87, chief executive officer of TradeStation Group, Inc.

Deysher Named Alumni Fellow by Penn State Alumni Association 27 Oct

Bryon Deysher, a 1977 graduate of the Penn State Smeal College of Business, was one of 21 Penn State alumni recognized in early October as Alumni Fellow by the Penn State Alumni Association. Deysher is president and chief executive officer of Methods Machine Tools, Inc. and a member of the Smeal Board of Visitors.

Price-Fixing Whistleblower and FBI Informant To Deliver Shoemaker Lecture at Penn State 15 Oct

Mark Whitacre, the corporate whistleblower who revealed price fixing at Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and spent more than eight years in federal prison for tax evasion and fraud, will deliver a lecture entitled “When Good Leaders Lose Their Way” from 6 to 7:15 p.m. on Nov. 6 in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.

Penn State Executive Programs Receives Gold Award for Junior Achievement Partnership 14 Oct

For its work with Junior Achievement USA, Penn State Executive Programs has won Chief Learning Officer magazine's highest executive education partnership award. The 2014 Gold award for Excellence in Academic Partnerships recognizes academic institutions that have partnered in the past year with an organization to teach its employees about a key business issue.

More Recent News... More Recent News...