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UPMC Recruiter Talks to Career Planning Strategies Students About Personal Brand

Students in the Penn State Smeal College of Business’ Career Planning Strategies course, BA 297A, recently learned about the importance of personal branding from UPMC campus recruiter Sammi Soriano, who visited class earlier this month. Soriano’s message to students was to always be aware of and maintain their personal brand—in school, in professional settings, and also in everyday life.
February 25, 2014

Students in the Penn State Smeal College of Business’ Career Planning Strategies course, BA 297A, recently learned about the importance of personal branding from UPMC campus recruiter Sammi Soriano, who visited class earlier this month. Soriano’s message to students was to always be aware of and maintain their personal brand—in school, in professional settings, and also in everyday life.

“A personal brand is all about perception,” said Soriano. “It’s how you present yourself—always being aware of the message you’re sending through your words, appearance, and actions.”

“Students should think about who they are and what’s important to them, and then act in such a way that demonstrates that. It’s the little things that build up a person’s perception of you.”

Career Planning Strategies is a one-credit course offered to provide students with an opportunity to delve deeper into the process of preparing for, finding, and transitioning into a career. Over the course of the semester, students enhance their communication and presentation skills and explore business etiquette. In addition, they develop the key components of their job search, such as building their resume and practicing interview skills. Many class sessions include lectures from recruiters on topics like interviewing, networking, communications, and ethics.

Soriano shared with the class many examples of both good and bad personal branding. She says she wanted to reinforce that every interaction is a chance to change someone’s impression, for better or for worse.

“It’s easy to forget that, no matter where you are, you never know who you’re going to meet,” Soriano said. “You have to be aware of how you treat people.”

This is an important message for Smeal students to remember, she says, even while away from campus on spring break or out of the country for a study abroad or global immersion experience.

“Smeal students are involved in a lot of things on campus, they excel academically, they tend to have real-world experience through internships, and they’ve been provided opportunities to develop leadership skills. They’re really the whole package.”

“Students should think about who they are and what’s important to them, and then act in such a way that demonstrates that,” Soriano said. “It’s the little things that build up a person’s perception of you.”

UPMC, an $11 billion global healthcare company, is one of Smeal’s newest corporate associates. The Corporate Associates program at the college provides increased visibility among Smeal students and direct access to students through organizations and career fairs.

“Smeal students are involved in a lot of things on campus, they excel academically, they tend to have real-world experience through internships, and they’ve been provided opportunities to develop leadership skills,” said Soriano. “They’re really the whole package.”

For more information on BA 297A Career Planning and Strategies, visit http://ugstudents.smeal.psu.edu/careers/paths-to-aid-your-career-development/career-planning-and-strategies.

About Undergraduate Education at the Smeal College of Business
The Smeal College of Business offers undergraduate majors and minors that span the business spectrum, preparing students for a business world that is complex, global, and diverse. Smeal undergraduate students have access to dozens of student organizations and involvement opportunities, study abroad partnerships around the world, and personalized career planning and academic advising services to help them thrive at Smeal and in their careers. Learn more at www.smeal.psu.edu/uge.

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